Cancel

Students First • L’élève avant tout Since 1909

Giving

About the Advancement Office

Our team is dedicated to supporting the LCC mission by fostering relationships with our community, and raising funds to enhance the LCC experience for our students. Fundraising is a large part of the important work we do for the school and our community. In addition, providing our community (parents, alumni, faculty, staff and friends of LCC) with opportunities to network, mentor and volunteer to support the school, our students and each other, is at the heart of everything we do!

Annual Giving

Volunteer

Ways to Give

Named Funds

Tribute Giving

Planned Giving

Did You Know?

LCC founder and first headmaster Dr. Charles Fosbery was the school’s pioneering major benefactor. In 1907-1909 he used $5,000 of his own money and sold bonds to supporters to purchase land on Royal Avenue and build the school.

Did You Know?

In 1912 the Caverhill family provided funding for the first of several expansions to our playing fields. In the mid-1950s, a significant donation from Miss Marjorie Caverhill, along with others, helped build the school’s first covered outdoor hockey rink.

Did You Know?

In 1920, Dr. Fosbery announced that he would transfer ownership of LCC to its alumni upon his eventual retirement (in 1935).

Did You Know?

Our playing fields were expanded in 1938 through a donation from the Old Boys Association, whose gift enabled the purchase of land adjacent to the Monkland Tennis Club.

Did You Know?

Recognizing the need for new science classrooms and laboratories, the Board launched a $100,000 campaign in 1958 that culminated in the opening of the Baillie Science Wing. Funds were raised through the generosity of the Old Boys, parents and friends of the school. In 2010, the science wing was renovated thanks to the generosity of members of the LCC community.

Did You Know?

The Old Boys Association started a campaign in 1962 that provided funds for a Junior School Gym as well as new Junior locker rooms and accommodations for increased enrolment in the school.

When a student finds something they're passionate about, we have to give them the opportunity to go as far as they can. That's the potential impact that a gift to the school can have. Christopher Shannon, Headmaster